Gilbert Pooman Swimmer
Gilbert Poolman

Licensed – Bonded – Insured

ROC #289980 & 309759

Gilbert Poolman LLC is an east valley swimming pool service and repair company servicing Chandler & Gilbert Arizona.

Frequently Asked Questions

Check your circuit breaker and reset if necessary.Check your G.F.C.I. (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) andreset if necessary.If your pool light is tied into a remote system,test your batteries. Are the remote frequencies set properly?
Your swimming pool will experience normal water loss through the process of evaporation. The rate of evaporation varies throughout the USA but if you are suspecting a greater than normal loss:.Closely inspect the swimming pool interior shell for cracks and defects. If you identify a structural problem with your swimming pool, we recommend that you request an appointment with one of our skilled service technicians. Check the flexible backwash hose for any water leakage. If water is leaking out of this hose, the “O”rings will need to be replaced inside the backwash valve.
Each swimming pool system has different water pressure tolerances. Please refer to your original owner’s equipment manual and/or startup instructions to identify the range of proper pressure for your swimming pool..If you suspect that the pressure is too high, check and clean out all debris from baskets. In addition, check to see if all your equipment valves are set properly and backwash your filter for several minutes.If you suspect that the pressure is too high, confirm that the pressure gauge reads zero when the equipment is off. If it does not fall back down to zero, you will need to replace the gauge.If you suspect that the pressure is too low, check and clean out all debris from baskets. In addition, check to see if all your equipment valves are set properly. If you suspect that the pressure is too low, check to see if the gauge reads zero when the equipment is off. If it does not fall back down to zero, you will need to replace the gauge.
The standard push/pull backwash valve is a plunger type of valve commonly found in sand and DE filter systems. Inside the valve is a plunger with two o-rings. When the valve is put into the backwash position, the flow of water through the filter is reversed. After putting the valve into the backwash position, the water is pumped out through the backwash rather then being returned to the swimming pool. Typically, a hose is attached to the valve so the operator can direct the water flow away from the swimming pool.Normally, there are four “O” rings in this type of valve. If these rings become damaged, worn or dried out, two things will occur. Unfiltered water may return to the swimming pool and/or the swimming pool will begin to lose water..Cap “O” Ring (1) seals the removable cap to the valve body. This “O” ring requires light lubrication and should be cleaned and lubricated each time the cap is removed. Shaft “O” Ring (1) is inside the cap and provides a seal where the plunger shaft goes through the cap. This “O” ring requires light lubrication. Apply a small amount of lubricant to the shaft immediately above and below the cap and then work the shaft up and down. This should be done once per month or when the shaft becomes difficult to move.Piston “O” Rings (2) are on the pistons or discs of the plunger. These rings require heavier lubrication. TURN OFF YOUR FILTER PUMP. Remove the cap and pull the plunger all the way out. Check the two “O” rings to make sure they are not damaged. They should fit snugly on the pistonswith no kinks or twists. Apply a pencil-sized bead of lubricant around each “O” ring and insert back into the plunger. Re-install the cap. This should be done once per month (or as necessary) when the shaft becomes difficult to move.

Most manufacturers recommend that the following procedure be done on an annual basis. Disassemble the filter, clean with garden hose, inspect the grids for tear and holes and re-coat new D.E..This type of filter utilizes D.E. powder to strain debris from the water (as recommended by the manufacturer). D.E. is the fossilized remains of plankton (diatoms) that have been ground into a fine powder. The cloth-covered grids within the filter must be pre-coated with D.E. powder for the proper filter operation. Pre-coat the filter grids by mixing a combination of D.E. and water. The slurry solution should have the consistency of watered down pancake batter. Slowly pour this slurry into the skimmer while the pump is running. Once the grids are coated, the debris will be removed from the swimming pool water. The water flows through the grids and flows out the end opening into the manifold and returned to the swimming pool. Backwashing a D.E. filter is similar to the procedure for the sand filter. By reversing the flow of water, the debris and dirty D.E. are loosened from the grid. This water is washed out of the filter and into the backwash line. After this is completed, the D.E. re-coating of the grids can proceed. D.E. powder is non-biodegradable and a separation tank may be installed on your backwash line to capture all of the flushed powder particles. 

You can monitor your pool’s pH level with a testing kit. There are many kinds of testing kits available; however, most homeowner versions are either reagent kits or test-strips. Reagent kits aren’t too difficult to use. You take a sample of pool water, then add liquids or tablets to it. The water changes color, indicating its chemical balance. Test-strips work differently. When you submerge them in the pool for a few seconds, dyes they contain cause them to change color. Next, match up the strip to a color chart to determine the pool’s pH level. Use this information to gauge what kind and how much of the chemicals your pool needs.

Pool filter maintenance is crucial for ensuring your pool water remains crystal clear and safe to swim in. Typically, it’s recommended to clean your pool filter every three to four months, but the frequency may vary depending on factors like pool usage and environmental conditions.

  • Start by turning off the pool pump to ensure safety during maintenance.
  • Remove the filter element or cartridge carefully.
  • Use a hose or a filter cleaning solution to remove debris, dirt, and grime from the filter.
  • Inspect the filter for any damage or wear and tear.
  • Reassemble the filter and restart the pump.

Regular filter cleaning not only enhances water circulation but also extends the lifespan of your filtration system, saving you money on potential repairs or replacements.

The recommended pH level for pool water is typically between 7 and 7.6. Maintaining this pH range is essential for swimmer comfort and overall pool health. If the pH level is too high (above 8), it can lead to skin irritation, while a pH level below 7 can cause eye discomfort.

Several factors, such as heavy rainfall, the number of swimmers, and chemical use, can affect pH levels. Regularly test your pool water and adjust the pH as needed using pH increasers or decreasers to keep it within the optimal range.

Consistently maintaining the right pH level ensures that your pool water remains safe, clear, and enjoyable for everyone.

Preventing and treating algae in your pool involves a combination of proactive measures and chemical treatments:

  • Maintain proper water balance with alkalinity around 100 ppm and a pH of 7.2.
  • Keep cyanuric acid levels between 30 and 50 ppm.
  • Run your filtration system daily to promote water circulation.
  • Add algaecide weekly as a preventive measure.
  • If you notice signs of algae growth, shock your pool with chlorine-based shock treatment.

These practices help prevent algae from taking hold and keep your pool water crystal clear.

To keep your pool water clean and balanced, you’ll need several essential chemicals:

  • Chlorine: Sanitizes and disinfects the water.
  • Pool Shock: Oxidizes organic contaminants.
  • Water Balance Chemicals: Maintain pH, alkalinity, and calcium hardness levels.
  • Algaecide: Prevents and treats algae growth.
  • Water Clarifier: Clears cloudy water.
  • Scale, Metal, and Stain Control: Prevents scale and metal buildup.
  • Pool Salt: For saltwater pools.

It’s crucial to use these chemicals correctly and in the right quantities. If you’re unsure, consult a pool professional for guidance to avoid overuse or imbalances that can harm your pool and swimmers.

Pool heating costs can add up, but you can reduce them by implementing these strategies:

  • Install a high-efficiency solar heater to maximize energy efficiency.
  • Use a pool cover to retain heat and minimize heat loss.
  • Manage water temperature conservatively, avoiding excessive heating.
  • Operate a smaller pump and run it less frequently to conserve energy.

Implementing these measures can help you enjoy a comfortably warm pool without breaking the bank on heating costs.

Cloudy pool water can result from various factors, including debris and poor water chemistry. To clear it up:

  • Skim, brush, and vacuum the pool to remove debris.
  • Test and balance the water’s pH, alkalinity, and sanitizer levels.
  • Shock the pool to kill bacteria and contaminants.
  • Run your filter continuously to improve circulation.
  • Add a pool water clarifier to help clear cloudy water.

By addressing these issues systematically, you can restore your pool’s water clarity and enjoy a sparkling clean swimming environment.

Shocking your pool regularly is essential to maintain water quality. As a general guideline, aim to shock your pool about once a week, with additional shock treatments following heavy pool usage or adverse weather conditions. Shocking helps break down contaminants, eliminate bacteria, and keep your water safe and clear.

No, you cannot use regular table salt in a saltwater pool system. Saltwater pools require a specific type of salt known as pool salt or solar salt, which has minimal impurities and is designed for use with saltwater chlorinators. Using table salt may result in pool equipment damage and water chemistry imbalances.

Properly winterizing your pool is crucial to protect it during the off-season.

Here are the steps:

  • Test and balance the water chemistry.
  • Clean the pool and filter thoroughly.
  • Shock the pool and circulate the water.
  • Prevent algae growth by adding algaecide and running the pump.
  • Turn off and winterize pool equipment, like heaters and pumps.
  • Plug and cover the pool to keep out debris and reduce evaporation.

Winterizing your pool ensures it remains in good condition and ready for use when the warmer months return.

While some pool pump issues can be addressed by homeowners, it’s essential to proceed with caution. Here are steps to troubleshoot common problems:

  • Check the skimmer water level to ensure it’s not too low.
  • Verify that the basket lid o-ring is properly sealed and lubricated.
  • Inspect the drain plug on the pump for any blockages.
  • Use shaving cream to identify air leaks in plugs, valves, and pipe joints.

If you’re unfamiliar with pool pump troubleshooting, it’s best to leave the job to professionals to avoid further damage and ensure the safety and efficiency of your pool system.

Check your circuit breaker and reset if necessary.Check your G.F.C.I. (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) andreset if necessary.If your pool light is tied into a remote system,test your batteries. Are the remote frequencies set properly?
Your swimming pool will experience normal water loss through the process of evaporation. The rate of evaporation varies throughout the USA but if you are suspecting a greater than normal loss:.Closely inspect the swimming pool interior shell for cracks and defects. If you identify a structural problem with your swimming pool, we recommend that you request an appointment with one of our skilled service technicians. Check the flexible backwash hose for any water leakage. If water is leaking out of this hose, the “O”rings will need to be replaced inside the backwash valve.
Each swimming pool system has different water pressure tolerances. Please refer to your original owner’s equipment manual and/or startup instructions to identify the range of proper pressure for your swimming pool..If you suspect that the pressure is too high, check and clean out all debris from baskets. In addition, check to see if all your equipment valves are set properly and backwash your filter for several minutes.If you suspect that the pressure is too high, confirm that the pressure gauge reads zero when the equipment is off. If it does not fall back down to zero, you will need to replace the gauge.If you suspect that the pressure is too low, check and clean out all debris from baskets. In addition, check to see if all your equipment valves are set properly. If you suspect that the pressure is too low, check to see if the gauge reads zero when the equipment is off. If it does not fall back down to zero, you will need to replace the gauge.
The standard push/pull backwash valve is a plunger type of valve commonly found in sand and DE filter systems. Inside the valve is a plunger with two o-rings. When the valve is put into the backwash position, the flow of water through the filter is reversed. After putting the valve into the backwash position, the water is pumped out through the backwash rather then being returned to the swimming pool. Typically, a hose is attached to the valve so the operator can direct the water flow away from the swimming pool.Normally, there are four “O” rings in this type of valve. If these rings become damaged, worn or dried out, two things will occur. Unfiltered water may return to the swimming pool and/or the swimming pool will begin to lose water..Cap “O” Ring (1) seals the removable cap to the valve body. This “O” ring requires light lubrication and should be cleaned and lubricated each time the cap is removed. Shaft “O” Ring (1) is inside the cap and provides a seal where the plunger shaft goes through the cap. This “O” ring requires light lubrication. Apply a small amount of lubricant to the shaft immediately above and below the cap and then work the shaft up and down. This should be done once per month or when the shaft becomes difficult to move.Piston “O” Rings (2) are on the pistons or discs of the plunger. These rings require heavier lubrication. TURN OFF YOUR FILTER PUMP. Remove the cap and pull the plunger all the way out. Check the two “O” rings to make sure they are not damaged. They should fit snugly on the pistonswith no kinks or twists. Apply a pencil-sized bead of lubricant around each “O” ring and insert back into the plunger. Re-install the cap. This should be done once per month (or as necessary) when the shaft becomes difficult to move.

Most manufacturers recommend that the following procedure be done on an annual basis. Disassemble the filter, clean with garden hose, inspect the grids for tear and holes and re-coat new D.E..This type of filter utilizes D.E. powder to strain debris from the water (as recommended by the manufacturer). D.E. is the fossilized remains of plankton (diatoms) that have been ground into a fine powder. The cloth-covered grids within the filter must be pre-coated with D.E. powder for the proper filter operation. Pre-coat the filter grids by mixing a combination of D.E. and water. The slurry solution should have the consistency of watered down pancake batter. Slowly pour this slurry into the skimmer while the pump is running. Once the grids are coated, the debris will be removed from the swimming pool water. The water flows through the grids and flows out the end opening into the manifold and returned to the swimming pool. Backwashing a D.E. filter is similar to the procedure for the sand filter. By reversing the flow of water, the debris and dirty D.E. are loosened from the grid. This water is washed out of the filter and into the backwash line. After this is completed, the D.E. re-coating of the grids can proceed. D.E. powder is non-biodegradable and a separation tank may be installed on your backwash line to capture all of the flushed powder particles. 

You can monitor your pool’s pH level with a testing kit. There are many kinds of testing kits available; however, most homeowner versions are either reagent kits or test-strips. Reagent kits aren’t too difficult to use. You take a sample of pool water, then add liquids or tablets to it. The water changes color, indicating its chemical balance. Test-strips work differently. When you submerge them in the pool for a few seconds, dyes they contain cause them to change color. Next, match up the strip to a color chart to determine the pool’s pH level. Use this information to gauge what kind and how much of the chemicals your pool needs.

Pool filter maintenance is crucial for ensuring your pool water remains crystal clear and safe to swim in. Typically, it’s recommended to clean your pool filter every three to four months, but the frequency may vary depending on factors like pool usage and environmental conditions.

  • Start by turning off the pool pump to ensure safety during maintenance.
  • Remove the filter element or cartridge carefully.
  • Use a hose or a filter cleaning solution to remove debris, dirt, and grime from the filter.
  • Inspect the filter for any damage or wear and tear.
  • Reassemble the filter and restart the pump.

Regular filter cleaning not only enhances water circulation but also extends the lifespan of your filtration system, saving you money on potential repairs or replacements.

The recommended pH level for pool water is typically between 7 and 7.6. Maintaining this pH range is essential for swimmer comfort and overall pool health. If the pH level is too high (above 8), it can lead to skin irritation, while a pH level below 7 can cause eye discomfort.

Several factors, such as heavy rainfall, the number of swimmers, and chemical use, can affect pH levels. Regularly test your pool water and adjust the pH as needed using pH increasers or decreasers to keep it within the optimal range.

Consistently maintaining the right pH level ensures that your pool water remains safe, clear, and enjoyable for everyone.

Preventing and treating algae in your pool involves a combination of proactive measures and chemical treatments:

  • Maintain proper water balance with alkalinity around 100 ppm and a pH of 7.2.
  • Keep cyanuric acid levels between 30 and 50 ppm.
  • Run your filtration system daily to promote water circulation.
  • Add algaecide weekly as a preventive measure.
  • If you notice signs of algae growth, shock your pool with chlorine-based shock treatment.

These practices help prevent algae from taking hold and keep your pool water crystal clear.

To keep your pool water clean and balanced, you’ll need several essential chemicals:

  • Chlorine: Sanitizes and disinfects the water.
  • Pool Shock: Oxidizes organic contaminants.
  • Water Balance Chemicals: Maintain pH, alkalinity, and calcium hardness levels.
  • Algaecide: Prevents and treats algae growth.
  • Water Clarifier: Clears cloudy water.
  • Scale, Metal, and Stain Control: Prevents scale and metal buildup.
  • Pool Salt: For saltwater pools.

It’s crucial to use these chemicals correctly and in the right quantities. If you’re unsure, consult a pool professional for guidance to avoid overuse or imbalances that can harm your pool and swimmers.

Pool heating costs can add up, but you can reduce them by implementing these strategies:

  • Install a high-efficiency solar heater to maximize energy efficiency.
  • Use a pool cover to retain heat and minimize heat loss.
  • Manage water temperature conservatively, avoiding excessive heating.
  • Operate a smaller pump and run it less frequently to conserve energy.

Implementing these measures can help you enjoy a comfortably warm pool without breaking the bank on heating costs.

Cloudy pool water can result from various factors, including debris and poor water chemistry. To clear it up:

  • Skim, brush, and vacuum the pool to remove debris.
  • Test and balance the water’s pH, alkalinity, and sanitizer levels.
  • Shock the pool to kill bacteria and contaminants.
  • Run your filter continuously to improve circulation.
  • Add a pool water clarifier to help clear cloudy water.

By addressing these issues systematically, you can restore your pool’s water clarity and enjoy a sparkling clean swimming environment.

Shocking your pool regularly is essential to maintain water quality. As a general guideline, aim to shock your pool about once a week, with additional shock treatments following heavy pool usage or adverse weather conditions. Shocking helps break down contaminants, eliminate bacteria, and keep your water safe and clear.

No, you cannot use regular table salt in a saltwater pool system. Saltwater pools require a specific type of salt known as pool salt or solar salt, which has minimal impurities and is designed for use with saltwater chlorinators. Using table salt may result in pool equipment damage and water chemistry imbalances.

Properly winterizing your pool is crucial to protect it during the off-season.

Here are the steps:

  • Test and balance the water chemistry.
  • Clean the pool and filter thoroughly.
  • Shock the pool and circulate the water.
  • Prevent algae growth by adding algaecide and running the pump.
  • Turn off and winterize pool equipment, like heaters and pumps.
  • Plug and cover the pool to keep out debris and reduce evaporation.

Winterizing your pool ensures it remains in good condition and ready for use when the warmer months return.

While some pool pump issues can be addressed by homeowners, it’s essential to proceed with caution. Here are steps to troubleshoot common problems:

  • Check the skimmer water level to ensure it’s not too low.
  • Verify that the basket lid o-ring is properly sealed and lubricated.
  • Inspect the drain plug on the pump for any blockages.
  • Use shaving cream to identify air leaks in plugs, valves, and pipe joints.

If you’re unfamiliar with pool pump troubleshooting, it’s best to leave the job to professionals to avoid further damage and ensure the safety and efficiency of your pool system.

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